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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
call us now... >> narrator: for me, that meant continuing to host radio and tv shows in san francisco... one of the issues that's come up in this campaign. ...and doing my best to ignore what wouldn't go away. it took two years before that odd collection of symptoms formed a whole diagnosis. i had parkinson's, and it was about to send my life in a new direction. it's not the worst diagnosis. right now, i'm doing fine. >> cross your fingers. thumbs up. press. >> narrator: but as everyone in this parkinson's exercise class told me, the disease is a relentless foe, handing out its challenges one by one. >> stretch your arms... >> there's something about the inevitability of it. parkinson's is a very gradual disease, but inevitably it's going to get you. >> lift your eyes. >> you go through a period of adjusting when you realize that your life is going to be different than you had imagined. >> narrator: life changes for parkinson's patients when a key neurotransmitter called dopamine goes missing. >> put your hands inside your knees. >> narrator: dopamine is like the oil that lubricates y
screaming, "this is history. this is history." >> we are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the united states of america. >> the speech he gave in 2004 was a stump speech that he gave... i mean, i was literally watching it on television and, like, reciting it. and i was calling a friend of mine. and both of us were cracking up that this was the same speech that he used to give to crowds of, like, ten people, or in some church on the south side where, you know, no one knew how to pronounce his name and, you know, they were just meeting him for the first time, and this was a speech he would give. >> thank you very much, everybody. god bless you! ( cheers and applause ) >> this guy's going places. >> this is like watching tiger woods. >> it's amazing he's still a state senator in illinois. >> narrator: immediately, the pundits and journalists began casting obama in a new light. >> forget about uniter and divider; tonight, we heard from a transcender. >> he lit it up. >> people talk about him quite openly as the first black presiden
. and most of us have been turning away students. in california, i know it's tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of students who couldn't even come in. >> smith: how do you meet that demand? >> what laguardia community college has done, and other colleges throughout the country have said, "come to us, and when we're full, we're going to shut the door." >> smith: and more and more, you're having to do that. >> we are having to do that. >> smith: the failure of community colleges to accommodate the demand has given clifford and others a huge opportunity. >> many schools are not meeting the market demand. we have somewhere between 30 million and 50 million working american adults who have not finished their college degree. >> smith: the question is, are for-profit schools the answer? in the '90s, clifford apprenticed with the undisputed master, the architect of the for-profit model, john sperling. in 1976,perling, a cambridge university-educated humanities professor, turned his back on traditional academia and moved to phoenix, arizona. he believed he could mass produce educat
is coming and tells us, "i have enough of this awful life, and i would like to go now," we should have the opportunity to help him. >> narrator: assisted suicide is legal in switzerland and several other countries, as well as three u.s. states. but only switzerland allows outsiders to come in to end their lives, leading to criticism about "suicide tourism." the backlash against ludwig minelli has been especially sharp, as his 30-year campaign for the right to die has led him to take increasingly provocative positions. >> we all know that suicide happens. and when you are saying suicide should not happen, you make taboo of suicide. so, we should change the starting point of suicide prevention, saying suicide is a marvelous possibility for a human being to restore themself from a situation which is unbearable. >> do you want some chocolate? >> i'm just happy over the grapes. >> narrator: an assisted suicide through dignitas would require craig to perform the final act himself, by drinking the liquid sedative that would end his life. but he's worried that he may soon lose the ability to s
... >> bergman: but as the news media reminds us, the players do sometimes take money and get caught, and then they become pariahs. >> ...for accepting impermissible benefits... >> "we got dirt on this guy. we got dirt on this guy. he can't play next year. he can't... look at him. we knew he was dirty." i mean, i just think there's... there's a lot of that goes on that people don't know, you know? and it's unfair to the college athlete. >> bergman: critics say that the document the players sign doesn't even allow them to benefit after they leave college... >> for bird and magic, it was the start of a rivalry... >> bergman: ...while the ncaa continues to make millions by marketing their games on dvds and selling the rights to broadcasters like espn classic and videogame makers like ea sports. >> he looked for the pass as well as the shot. >> changed my life with this game. >> bergman: in 1995, ed o'bannon was the national player of the year and led ucla to victory in the final four. >> ucla can hang a banner in westwood! >> bergman: today, o'bannon receives no residuals from any game
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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